Shipwrecks and Lighthouses


Go Back to Map – Shipwrecks and Lighthouses Just west of Klippepunt and Slang Bay, on the Oyster Bay beach, the Suffolk wrecked in 1900. It carried a cargo of 900 horses to be used by the British Cavalry in the Boer War. Only two horses reached the land alive. Suffolk loading map - please wait...Map could not be loaded - please enable Javascript!→ more information Just west of Klippepunt and Slang Bay, on the Oyster Bay...

Read More

Go Back to Map – Shipwrecks and Lighthouses At Huisklip lie the remains of the Lyngenfjord, en route from France to Madagascar. She was wrecked on 14 January 1938. The Rademeyer family were camping at their seaside shack at Huisklip and were awakened early by their children shouting to their elders that they must come as the ship had stranded. They could see the mast and funnel sticking up above a rocky promontory. The ship was...

Read More

Go Back to Map – Shipwrecks and Lighthouses In a bay about a half mile east of the Panaghia wreck lie the remains of the Bender, a local Port Elizabeth based trawler. She carried a crew of fifteen of whom only two were saved. Bender loading map - please wait...Map could not be loaded - please enable Javascript!→ more information In a bay about a half mile east of the Panaghia wreck lie the remains of the Bender. Bender...

Read More

Go Back to Map – Shipwrecks and Lighthouses On the 17 February 1938, three miles east of the President Reitz, the Panaghia was wrecked close inshore. This happened in thick fog whilst she was sailing from Argentina to Australia in ballast. Captain Pettersen salvaged the wreck and the incident caused little interest. Her boilers can still be seen at low water. Her hatch covers, having lain under water for over a year were...

Read More

Go Back to Map – Shipwrecks and Lighthouses On 3 July 1989 the Meng Yaw, a Chinese Fishing trawler ran aground close to Brakkeduine. They discharged of 800 tons of illegally caught frozen squid and pumped off 130 tons of fuel in an anti-pollution operation. Meng Yaw loading map - please wait...Map could not be loaded - please enable Javascript!→ more information On 3 July 1989 the Meng Yaw, a Chinese Fishing trawler ran...

Read More

Go Back to Map – Shipwrecks and Lighthouses On 20 February 1929 the Cape Recife was wrecked just west of the Seal Point Lighthouse due to dense fog. No lives were lost, and remains can still be seen at Johnson’s Pool during low tide. Cape Recife loading map - please wait...Map could not be loaded - please enable Javascript!→ more information On 20 February 1929 the Cape Recife was wrecked just west of the Seal Point...

Read More

Go Back to Map – Shipwrecks and Lighthouses HMS OSPREY was a wooden screw Vigilant class gunvessel, built in 1856 by Fletcher, Limehouse. In the morning of 30 May 1867, HMS OSPREY (William Menzies) was wrecked, 10 miles West from Seal Point Lighthouse, Cape St. Francis, South Africa. One men was lost. The boiler can still be seen about 3km west of Cape St Francis. HMS OSPREY loading map - please wait...Map could not be loaded -...

Read More

Go Back to Map – Shipwrecks and Lighthouses The Seal Point Lighthouse, standing at 27,75m, is the tallest masonry lighthouse in South Africa and is situated on the second southernmost point of Africa. Built in 1878, the lighthouse is still operational with a modern radio beacon, fog signal and fog detector. The 28m circular masonry tower supports a lantern house and second order revolving lantern consisting of 8 catadioptric...

Read More

General info on local wrecks The Cape of Good Hope has been famous for more than 500 years as the ‘graveyard of ships’. And sea captains of yore also talked about another danger spot: the ‘mountains of water’ off the Wild Coast of the Eastern Cape. Indeed, the 3 000km South African coastline has claimed perhaps 3 000 vessels over the centuries, with known records dating back to the 1500’s – one for every...

Read More